direct object

An object is a noun which receives the action of a verb or verbal. It is in accusative case.  When it is the object of a verb, it is often called a “direct object;” cf indirect object.  An object is found by asking “what?”

Jeb built a house.

Ask yourself…”Jeb built what?” Jeb built a house. Hence, “house” is the object of the verb “built”.


Greek:

An object is in the accusative case.


Hebrew:

An object is often marked out by the object marker word. Direct objects can also be attached directly to their verb by way of a suffix; see this overview or the video instruction here and here.